Stanley A. Makowski obituary photo
 
In Memory of

Stanley A. Makowski

Unknown

Obituary


Stanley (Jimmy) Makowski
Retired Printer, 93

Stanley Makowski, owner and operated National Press of Baltimore- also Instant Printing (the original While You Wait Printers) had five local copy centers in Baltimore. He lived in Perry Hall 45 years as a printer and retired in 1990, giving the business to his son Michael. Stanley Makowski died of heart failure on June 21, 2011.
He was born in Canton on April 20, 1918. In 1931, both of his parents died within one year of each other leaving behind a family of eight children. Stanley was...

Stanley (Jimmy) Makowski
Retired Printer, 93

Stanley Makowski, owner and operated National Press of Baltimore- also Instant Printing (the original While You Wait Printers) had five local copy centers in Baltimore. He lived in Perry Hall 45 years as a printer and retired in 1990, giving the business to his son Michael. Stanley Makowski died of heart failure on June 21, 2011.
He was born in Canton on April 20, 1918. In 1931, both of his parents died within one year of each other leaving behind a family of eight children. Stanley was a thirteen year old at the time. He graduated from St. Casmir parochial school in 1934 and attended night classes at Poly High School for four years.
Stanley defined himself as a "Self-Made Man". He was a pleasant and likable person who was energetic, consciencous, mechanically inclined and a very good provider. He was the vice president of State Wide Democratic Club of Maryland in 1946. He served for ten years during Gov. Lanes administration. He was also a member of Disabled American Veterans, Dundalk Chapter 21 Inc. and Veterans of Foreign Wars, Charles Evering Post 6505.
Partnering with his brother, Albert, they owned and operated a Maryland bottling company. Nuesinger's Famous Brewed Birch Beer was a premium since 1912, offering bottles or kegs and other pure fruit flavored soft drinks. His brother Albert was the brew master. Expanding from a single truck to six route trucks, deliveries were made to amusement parks, Middle River- Carlins, Druid Hill Park, restaurants, bars and clubs.
Stanley Makowski was drafted in 1941. After basic training, he was assigned to the 28th Infantry Division, Co. L. After being wounded in the legs in Normandy, he was assigned to the 28th Division Headquarters. During this time, he served as a supply clerk, electrical technician in charge of a power plant and a demolition technician. During the forceful German offensive in the Ardennes, he established an important position in the defense of the town of Wiltz, Luxembourg. In order to strengthen the defense of the town, he placed antitank mines at an advantageous location and remained despite enemy mortar shells and small arms fire.
On December 20, 1944, he was captured as a POW. He was one of seventeen survivors. He was in captivity for 113 days. He once retold his experience by describing it as "very cold, snowy day where Germans marched him day after day through below freezing weather. He was forced to march to another prisoner camp to dig in gravel and bury dead German soldiers. Several days after arriving at the new prison camp the First Army liberated him. He was shipped to France, Camp Lucky Star, for rehabilitation and subject to discharge." During his service to his country, he was awarded the Bronze Star, Good Conduct Medal, American Defense Service Medal, European African Middle Eastern Service Ribbon, POW Medal and the Purple Heart. He was honorably discharged from the Army in July of 1945.
Mr. Makowski returned to Baltimore to his engaged sweet heart since June of 1942 who waited for him to return. He married Helen J. Fonti on June 10, 1945 at St. Ambrose Church. He committed himself to his wife.
He is survived by his loving, caring, wife and companion of 66 years, former Helen J. Fonti, His three sons; Ronald, Stephen, and Michael; and two daughters; Angela Langrhr and Donna Dajani; reside in Perry Hall. Mr. Makowski had 14 grandchildren and 10 great-grandchildren. He is also survived by his sister Margaret Duffy of Baltimore.